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Editor’s Page March 2017

by Clean India Journal - Editor
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A live insect in a packet of chips, a beetle in a burger bun, a human nail or a cigarette butt in packages of processed foods are some of the complaints received by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland last year. Across the globe food hygiene norms are becoming stringent considering the increase in complaints, including that of food poisoning. In India too there is a growing awareness about the need to follow best cleaning practices in food factories and this was evident going by the number of visitors from the food sector at the last Clean India Technology Week in Hyderabad. Clean India Journal is widely circulated to the food processing companies. This issue of the magazine attempts to give an account of the different kinds of cleaning required and the investments needed to maintain high level of hygiene in food processing and packaging units both in the organised and unorganised sectors. Good cleaning process does not cost, it pays. The condition of the outside of the plant is equally important, the focus being on waste disposal, pest management and dust control.

We also have brought to the readers a summary of an interesting debate on a very debatable topic at the last CTW in January: Whose responsibility is it when it comes to achieving success in pest management in hotels? Is it of the service providers or of the housekeeping team? The housekeepers’ claim is that there is no on-site supervision by the service providers and the pest control technicians lacked training. On the other hand, the service providers put the blame on to the in-house team for choosing a service partner based on lower quotes. There are many hurdles to overcome in this area and Clean India Journal will continue to explore the challenges and remedies.

The next Clean India Technology Week to be held in Mumbai in January 2018 has already assumed a larger canvass with each of the Expos growing in size in terms of the number of exhibiting companies. While Clean India Pulire has established itself globally, the other Expos for Laundry, Car Care, Waste Technology and Facility Services are fast finding their own significant places under CTW.
Mangala-Chandran-sign

Mangala Chandran
editor@virtualinfo.in

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