Thursday, April 25, 2024
 - 
Afrikaans
 - 
af
Albanian
 - 
sq
Amharic
 - 
am
Arabic
 - 
ar
Armenian
 - 
hy
Azerbaijani
 - 
az
Basque
 - 
eu
Belarusian
 - 
be
Bengali
 - 
bn
Bosnian
 - 
bs
Bulgarian
 - 
bg
Catalan
 - 
ca
Cebuano
 - 
ceb
Chichewa
 - 
ny
Chinese (Simplified)
 - 
zh-CN
Chinese (Traditional)
 - 
zh-TW
Corsican
 - 
co
Croatian
 - 
hr
Czech
 - 
cs
Danish
 - 
da
Dutch
 - 
nl
English
 - 
en
Esperanto
 - 
eo
Estonian
 - 
et
Filipino
 - 
tl
Finnish
 - 
fi
French
 - 
fr
Frisian
 - 
fy
Galician
 - 
gl
Georgian
 - 
ka
German
 - 
de
Greek
 - 
el
Gujarati
 - 
gu
Haitian Creole
 - 
ht
Hausa
 - 
ha
Hawaiian
 - 
haw
Hebrew
 - 
iw
Hindi
 - 
hi
Hmong
 - 
hmn
Hungarian
 - 
hu
Icelandic
 - 
is
Igbo
 - 
ig
Indonesian
 - 
id
Irish
 - 
ga
Italian
 - 
it
Japanese
 - 
ja
Javanese
 - 
jw
Kannada
 - 
kn
Kazakh
 - 
kk
Khmer
 - 
km
Korean
 - 
ko
Kurdish (Kurmanji)
 - 
ku
Kyrgyz
 - 
ky
Lao
 - 
lo
Latin
 - 
la
Latvian
 - 
lv
Lithuanian
 - 
lt
Luxembourgish
 - 
lb
Macedonian
 - 
mk
Malagasy
 - 
mg
Malay
 - 
ms
Malayalam
 - 
ml
Maltese
 - 
mt
Maori
 - 
mi
Marathi
 - 
mr
Mongolian
 - 
mn
Myanmar (Burmese)
 - 
my
Nepali
 - 
ne
Norwegian
 - 
no
Pashto
 - 
ps
Persian
 - 
fa
Polish
 - 
pl
Portuguese
 - 
pt
Punjabi
 - 
pa
Romanian
 - 
ro
Russian
 - 
ru
Samoan
 - 
sm
Scots Gaelic
 - 
gd
Serbian
 - 
sr
Sesotho
 - 
st
Shona
 - 
sn
Sindhi
 - 
sd
Sinhala
 - 
si
Slovak
 - 
sk
Slovenian
 - 
sl
Somali
 - 
so
Spanish
 - 
es
Sundanese
 - 
su
Swahili
 - 
sw
Swedish
 - 
sv
Tajik
 - 
tg
Tamil
 - 
ta
Telugu
 - 
te
Thai
 - 
th
Turkish
 - 
tr
Ukrainian
 - 
uk
Urdu
 - 
ur
Uzbek
 - 
uz
Vietnamese
 - 
vi
Welsh
 - 
cy
Xhosa
 - 
xh
Yiddish
 - 
yi
Yoruba
 - 
yo
Zulu
 - 
zu
Subscriber Login

Handling linen the right way

by Admin
0 comment

Hydro-extraction

It is the removal of excess moisture through centrifugal action and is equivalent to wringing in handwashing. The absorbency of the fabric affects the length of the cycle (six to eight minutes) and the residue of moisture (10-30%). Draining must precede hydro-extraction and hydro-extraction must precede tumble drying.

Some articles cannot be hydro-extracted so there is a pumping action to draw out the water from the linen load. Too short an extraction time will increase the drying time and may hinder the proper operation of finishing equipment. The most efficient extraction for cottons takes place at temperatures higher than 38ºC but lower than 55ºC so that they are not too hot to handle. Polyesters and blends should be extracted at a temperature below 38ºC to prevent wrinkling.

The compact mass of hydro-extracted clothes is referred to as ‘cheese’.

Unloading

Transferring washed linen from the hydro-extractor to the tumble dryer is a difficult task because of the added weight of moisture. Articles may be manually removed and put into trolleys. Tilting and dumping machines reduce the physical effort of manual unloading. A laundry cart can be positioned under the door and a push button operated to rotate the cylinder and empty its contents. Alternatively, the machine can unload onto a conveyor belt that will transport the linen to the next set of operations.

Tumble Drying

This process is capable of rendering the linen completely dry by blowing hot air ranging between 40ºC to 60ºC onto the articles as they are slowly circulated in the rotating drum. For articles that are susceptible to damage by heat, there is the option of simply airing by circulating air at room temperature. To avoid wrinkles and the risk of spontaneous combustion, many dryers have a cool-down cycle at predetermined intervals. The process of tumble-drying creates a good deal of wear and tear on the fabric as particles of lint come off the fabric in the drying process. The time taken is approximately 30 minutes depending on whether the article is to be completely or partially dried.

Finishing

For those articles that require a pressed finish, ironing and pressing are usual, but there are also other finishing equipment. Articles like blankets, towels, candlewick bedspreads, hosiery, etc., do not require a pressed finish and are only tumble-dried.

Folding

Can be done by machine but in most cases is carried out completely manually or at least the finishing folds are done manually. The use of a folding stand helps minimise this otherwise very labour-intensive operation. Manual folding makes it possible to achieve the desired fold as well as ensure quality control. Employees in this area are the ones who ‘reject’ stained linen and are a good source for ascertaining what types and quantities of stains commonly occur. This is an important stage in the processing of laundered linen as it can be the ‘bottleneck’ in an otherwise efficient laundry operation. Correct folding is important to the appearance of the article and makes it convenient to store and use.

Airing

This is essential prior to storage, especially if the articles are to be stored in closed shelves. It ensures that any moisture that is likely to cause mildew will be got rid of.

Storage

Should be properly done in a well–designed storage space. Linen should be allowed a rest period to recuperate before it is used again. The life span of linen is greatly increased if proper rotation of stock is carried out, thereby ensuring a ‘rest period’ between uses. As a general rule, at any given time, approximately 50% of the total linen inventory should be on the shelves, 25% in use and 25% in processing. The storage area must be isolated from the soiled linen and kept clean.

Transfer

The linen is issued to the unit/department for use. Since transfer of clean linen is usually done by linen trolleys, it is important to keep the trolleys clean.

Use

The linen is utilised for the necessary function intended and the cycle begins all over again.

Washing Machine

The machine may be top loading (lesser capacity), front loading or side loading (for large loads in industrial laundering)

It rotates for 15 seconds in one direction, stops and reverses direction for 15 seconds. This prevents the ‘roping’ of linen in the drum.

The speed of rotation of the drum depends on the diameter and ranges between 40 to 60rpm.

Centrifugal action of the drum causes friction between the clothes thereby suspending dirt.

The water level is referred to as ‘dip’.

The temperature of water ranges from 30ºC to 95ºC.

Machines operate on manual switches, dial settings, computerised cards or on computer panels.

Modern machinery have sensors that can gauge the length of cycle, level and temperature of water, amount of laundry agent and when it should be added in the wash cycle as well as the type of drum action, for a specific wash load.

Industrial machinery have a control panel which displays the stage in the wash cycle in progress, the time remaining for the completion of the cycle, the temperature of water and the chemical in use.

Machines which carry out washing as well as hydro-extraction are called washer extractors.

Avril Sule
Hospitality Educator and Trainer

Launderette with a difference

The new launderette opened by Clean Bean, a Bristol based company, offers not only eco-friendly laundry services but also has an internet café, TV and coffee bar for their customers. Girbau UK has equipped the new launderette with five of its high-speed, energy efficient washers, including four HS-6008s and an HS-6017, as well as five dryers. The launderette has large capacity Pro Series II Dryer and four smaller Pro-Series Stack Commercial Dryers deliver energy efficiency, high productivity, quick drying and low maintenance.

Clean Bean’s five high-speed washers from Girbau’s ‘6 Series’ range offer spin speeds of up to 1,000rpm, excellent washing performance and reduced cycle times. The HS-6008 has been named the most energy-efficient in its class by US body Energy Star. The launderette also offers a range of certified organic washing products.

Girbau renames France centre

The Girbau Group’s R&D and manufacturing centre in France is to be called Société Girbau Robotics, replacing the previous name of Société Jean Michel. The change completes the restructuring of the centre aimed at enhancing the process robotic equipment for laundries manufactured in this factory.

Since the acquisition of the French production centre, the Girbau Group’s joint working team at its central headquarters in Vic (Barcelona), along with the R&D and operations team in Aix-les-Bains, has completed the renovation of the full range of feeders, folders, stackers and monorail systems

You may also like

Leave a Comment

Clean India Journal, remains unrivalled as India’s only magazine dedicated to cleaning & hygiene from the last 17 years.
It remains unrivalled as the leading trade publication reaching professionals across sectors who are involved with industrial, commercial, and institutional cleaning.

The magazine covers the latest industry news, insights, opinions and technologies with in-depth feature articles, case studies and relevant issues prevelant in the cleaning and hygiene sector.

Top Stories

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Copyright © 2005 Clean India Journal All rights reserved.