Tuesday, May 21, 2024
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Lidless toilets spread germs: A study

by Admin
0 comment

A recent study by Microbiology Department at Leeds General Infirmary, the UK, has found that lidless toilets spread germs, especially after flushing. The report on the study published in the International Journal of Hospital Infection stated that the lid of the toilet should always be put down before flushing. The researchers measured the airborne suspension of the Clostridium difficile (C.diff) bacteria in addition to surface contamination after flushing of both lidless and lidded toilets.

The air samples, 25cm above the toilet, contained the highest numbers of C.diff taken immediately after flushing. Researchers also found the number of viable bacteria to be 12-fold higher from open toilets compared with the same toilet when the lid was closed.

Even with the implementation of strict disinfecting protocols, C.difficile clusters continue to spring up in healthcare settings. The airborne bacteria can settle on virtually any surface, from sink to towels and even toothbrushes!

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