Wednesday, April 24, 2024
 - 
Afrikaans
 - 
af
Albanian
 - 
sq
Amharic
 - 
am
Arabic
 - 
ar
Armenian
 - 
hy
Azerbaijani
 - 
az
Basque
 - 
eu
Belarusian
 - 
be
Bengali
 - 
bn
Bosnian
 - 
bs
Bulgarian
 - 
bg
Catalan
 - 
ca
Cebuano
 - 
ceb
Chichewa
 - 
ny
Chinese (Simplified)
 - 
zh-CN
Chinese (Traditional)
 - 
zh-TW
Corsican
 - 
co
Croatian
 - 
hr
Czech
 - 
cs
Danish
 - 
da
Dutch
 - 
nl
English
 - 
en
Esperanto
 - 
eo
Estonian
 - 
et
Filipino
 - 
tl
Finnish
 - 
fi
French
 - 
fr
Frisian
 - 
fy
Galician
 - 
gl
Georgian
 - 
ka
German
 - 
de
Greek
 - 
el
Gujarati
 - 
gu
Haitian Creole
 - 
ht
Hausa
 - 
ha
Hawaiian
 - 
haw
Hebrew
 - 
iw
Hindi
 - 
hi
Hmong
 - 
hmn
Hungarian
 - 
hu
Icelandic
 - 
is
Igbo
 - 
ig
Indonesian
 - 
id
Irish
 - 
ga
Italian
 - 
it
Japanese
 - 
ja
Javanese
 - 
jw
Kannada
 - 
kn
Kazakh
 - 
kk
Khmer
 - 
km
Korean
 - 
ko
Kurdish (Kurmanji)
 - 
ku
Kyrgyz
 - 
ky
Lao
 - 
lo
Latin
 - 
la
Latvian
 - 
lv
Lithuanian
 - 
lt
Luxembourgish
 - 
lb
Macedonian
 - 
mk
Malagasy
 - 
mg
Malay
 - 
ms
Malayalam
 - 
ml
Maltese
 - 
mt
Maori
 - 
mi
Marathi
 - 
mr
Mongolian
 - 
mn
Myanmar (Burmese)
 - 
my
Nepali
 - 
ne
Norwegian
 - 
no
Pashto
 - 
ps
Persian
 - 
fa
Polish
 - 
pl
Portuguese
 - 
pt
Punjabi
 - 
pa
Romanian
 - 
ro
Russian
 - 
ru
Samoan
 - 
sm
Scots Gaelic
 - 
gd
Serbian
 - 
sr
Sesotho
 - 
st
Shona
 - 
sn
Sindhi
 - 
sd
Sinhala
 - 
si
Slovak
 - 
sk
Slovenian
 - 
sl
Somali
 - 
so
Spanish
 - 
es
Sundanese
 - 
su
Swahili
 - 
sw
Swedish
 - 
sv
Tajik
 - 
tg
Tamil
 - 
ta
Telugu
 - 
te
Thai
 - 
th
Turkish
 - 
tr
Ukrainian
 - 
uk
Urdu
 - 
ur
Uzbek
 - 
uz
Vietnamese
 - 
vi
Welsh
 - 
cy
Xhosa
 - 
xh
Yiddish
 - 
yi
Yoruba
 - 
yo
Zulu
 - 
zu
Subscriber Login

Shifting to Enzymatic Cleaning Processes

by Clean India Journal Editor
0 comment

With increasing environmental consciousness and the chase to meet sustainability goals, there is a major shift towards non-chemical-based cleaning solutions. But, it is important to comprehend the cleaning chemical composition and its role in various applications, says Kshitiz Chaudhary, Founder & MD, Cizar Hygienecare Pvt. Ltd

To understand cleaning agents and their role in the cleaning process, it is important to look back at the work of Dr Herbert Sinner, a German chemical engineer. In 1959, Dr Sinner introduced the concept of the “Sinner’s Circle,” which consists of four factors: time, mechanical force, chemistry, and temperature. These factors are crucial in achieving effective cleaning. For example, when dealing with heavy oil on cookware, using hot water (temperature) helps to remove the oil with less effort (mechanical force), and soaking the utensil in soap water for a period of time enhances the cleaning result.

According to Dr Sinner, alkaline cleaning agents (with a pH of 7-14) are ideal for removing oil-based dirt and grime, as the alkaline medium, when combined with temperature, loosens the oil, allowing for easier removal through mechanical action. On the other hand, acidic cleaning agents (with a pH of 7-0) are used for tackling inorganic matter like water scale, as seen in products like Toilet Bowl Cleaner and Descaler.

In today’s world, where we have already caused significant harm to our environment, it is crucial to address the issue of pollution. As a result, there is a growing focus on chemical-free cleaning agents and a shift towards green and eco-friendly alternatives. However, it is important to note that the term “sustainable” encompasses a broader and more responsible approach than simply being green and eco-friendly. While there are now numerous organic and natural cleaning agents available in the market, they often fail to meet expectations or come at a higher cost, making them an unsustainable solution.

To truly achieve a better cleaning experience, we need to revisit Dr Sinner’s principles and understand that highly alkaline (caustic soda) based cleaning agents are essential. These agents can be easily obtained at a low cost, unlike their organic and natural counterparts, which struggle to achieve the same level of alkalinity. So, what is the sustainable solution to eliminate toxic chemical-based cleaning agents?

Enzymatic cleaners are formulated with enzymes that effectively break down various types of soils at a neutral pH. These enzymes, such as proteases, amylases, urease, and lipases, belong to the protein compound class and act as catalysts to speed up chemical reactions by lowering the activation energy.

By incorporating enzymes into organic and natural cleaning agents, like Dr Sinner’s Circle, the molecular structure of target substances such as oil, fat, protein, carbohydrate, and urine can be efficiently broken down without the need for alkalinity, high temperatures, mechanical action, or prolonged soaking time. This shift towards enzyme-based cleaning agents offers a pocket-friendly and sustainable solution, promoting green and eco-friendly practices.

You may also like

Leave a Comment

Clean India Journal, remains unrivalled as India’s only magazine dedicated to cleaning & hygiene from the last 17 years.
It remains unrivalled as the leading trade publication reaching professionals across sectors who are involved with industrial, commercial, and institutional cleaning.

The magazine covers the latest industry news, insights, opinions and technologies with in-depth feature articles, case studies and relevant issues prevelant in the cleaning and hygiene sector.

Top Stories

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Copyright © 2005 Clean India Journal All rights reserved.