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Transparent waste management Beyond greenwashing and fines

by Clean India Journal Editor
0 comment

The waste management industry in India has long grappled with challenges ranging from inadequate infrastructure to lax enforcement of regulations. The recent findings of the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) audit, which revealed irregularities in three state boards and imposed fines exceeding `355 crore on four firms for violating norms, underscore the pressing need for transparency and traceability in waste management practices.

The CPCB audit shed light on significant gaps in compliance across the waste management sector, highlighting the potential for greenwashing – a deceptive practice where companies falsely claim to be environmentally responsible. In this case falsely claim to be collection and recycling more than they actually do, in order to claim higher EPR credits. Such practices not only erode public trust but also hinder the progress towards sustainable waste management practices.

Transparency in the waste management supply chain is essential to ensure accountability and prevent greenwashing. The need for a comprehensive traceable system becomes apparent as regulatory bodies identify discrepancies and penalize non-compliant entities. Without a robust mechanism to trace the origin and destination of waste, it becomes challenging to hold responsible parties accountable.

In this context, Satma CE operational software emerges as a promising solution to eliminate ambiguity and mitigate the risk of greenwashing in the waste management sector. Unlike traditional plug-in transparency softwares, Satma CE operates throughout the supply chain, providing real-time insights into the operations of each company using it. This operational software integrates seamlessly into daily processes, making transparency a natural outcome of its use.

The software addresses the gaps in the CPCB audits by providing real traceability which includes micro verification: which is the granular examination of each transaction in the waste supply chain from a authenticated 3rd party, providing a detailed account of the journey of waste from its generation to segregation to recycling to product making or disposal. This level of scrutiny not only ensures compliance with environmental norms but also plays a pivotal role in preventing fraudulent practices and greenwashing.

Stakeholders can delve into the specifics of each transaction, fostering a culture of accountability and trust throughout the waste management supply chain. In an industry where every transaction holds environmental implications, real traceability becomes a powerful tool for driving genuine sustainability and mitigating the risks associated with deceptive practices.

Satma CE facilitates seamless communication and information exchange amongst different stakeholders of the waste management ecosystem, all of which is digitally and automatically captured by companies using it. This ensures that regulatory bodies, waste generators, and waste management entities are on the same page, promoting a collaborative approach towards sustainable waste management practices.

The waste management industry in India is at a crucial juncture where transparency and traceability are not just desirable but imperative. The CPCB audit findings serve as a wake-up call for the industry to adopt innovative solutions that go beyond mere paper trails and paper compliance (which can contain falsified information).

Satma CE not only aligns with regulatory requirements but also fosters a culture of transparency throughout the supply chain. As India strives to enhance its waste management practices, embracing tools like Satma CE is a significant step towards a more sustainable and accountable future.

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