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Temple Cleaning activity of Faber Sindoori

by Admin
0 comment

Renowned temples in Chennai are now being maintained by Faber Sindoori Management Services Private Limited. Lathaa Ganesh, Senior General Manager (Housekeeping) told Clean India Journal, “Cleaning a temple has amazing merits and we have been given the opportunity to accumulate these merits. At present, we are maintaining three properties, including the famous Kapaleeshwar temple in Chennai — in a very cost effective manner.”

Around 30 staff members have been deployed to maintain these temples round-the-clock. Lathaa adds, “At Kapaleeshwar temple, we have a staff of 10 along with a supervisor stationed permanently. Generally, the flooring and other areas are scrubbed or cleaned at noon when the temple is closed. We are allowed to use the cleaning equipment only in the temple premises not inside the sanctum sanctorum.

“We are restricted from using any kind of cleaning tools inside the temple and it becomes difficult to clean certain areas… where the abhishek is performed. At present, we are cleaning the temple premises with R1 and R2 and in some areas we also use liquid-soap. Oil spillage is another big problem, especially on Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, when oil usage is more and the footfall is also higher.”

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