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Dung paper

by Admin
0 comment

Assam-based ‘Elrhino’ makes use of green methods to convert elephant and rhino dung into paper. The paper and the production of its related articles have not only provided employment to youth in the region, but have also worked towards efforts to protect the endangered species of one horned rhino. The process of making the paper starts with boiling the dung and then drying it in the sun. It is then re-boiled with caustic soda for removing the lignin and purifying it further. Later, cotton hosiery rag is chopped and mixed with the dung in a Hollander beater where it turns into pulp. The pulp is made into paper and then embellishments such as flowers, silk thread, etc., are added before it is couched and loft dried. The dried paper is calendared and cut into required sizes. Products such as lamp shades, office stationery and origami are also made from the paper.

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