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Plastic waste, a fuel for cement kilns

by Admin
0 comment

The Central Government intends making it mandatory for cement makers to use hazardous waste that can burn such as plastic waste and tyre chips as alternative fuel in cement kilns. This can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and avoid creation of landfills. Not only will this prove cost effective for cement firms, it would also help avoid investments in expensive incinerators. Wastes co-processed by cement companies include sludge from petrochemical or oil refinery, waste oil, paint sludge, effluent treatment plant (ETP) sludge, and spent carbon.

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