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Shallow waters, deep trouble

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New and existing sources of water are becoming increasingly scarce or too costly to harvest. Curtailing water use and reusing water is no longer just desirable but almost mandatory.

Facilities can conserve a significant percentage of water by implementing measures targeting distribution system improvements (including leak detection, repair, and replacement), heating and cooling (including steam boilers, cooling towers, and single pass cooling), landscaping/irrigation and more.

Utilising non-potable water sources such as greywater for flushing toilets and urinals further reduces overall potable water consumption. Other sources include rainwater, stormwater, air-conditioning condensate, fountain discharge, on-site reclaimed wastewater, process equipment discharge etc.

An environmentally conscious water upgrade can reduce potable water, wastewater discharge and energy bills by lowering resource consumption. These benefits are diminished if the system is not well maintained. Leaks from faulty fixtures and piping drastically increase water consumption. Maintenance of flush valves is imperative, as a constantly running toilet can waste over 200 gallons of water each day.

If municipal water is not available, Indian facilities have so far managed to find ways to source water from somewhere or the other. Someday soon, no amount of money will be able to buy water easily and in the amount required.

Facilities need to introspect about minimising their water burden. Read on to learn about how they can.

1) Drip a drop, save a drop 

2) Lighting the path to energy efficiency

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