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Delhi hospitals violating DPCB rules

by Clean India Journal Editor
0 comment

In a shocking revelation, the Delhi Pollution Control Board (DPCB) has found that the Bio-Medical Waste Management and Handling Rules made operative 15-years ago,are still not being followed by a large number of hospitals and nursing homes in the country’s capital.A team of DPCB, while inspecting medical institutes, discovered that a large number of them go to the extent of throwing highly toxic medical in open spaces thus jeopardizing the lives of both the patients staying in the hospitals and the visitors coming there.

The hospitals have been sent show-cause notices and further inspections would be carried out to see whether the rules have been implemented or not. There-after, decisions would be taken regarding their closure. According to the BMW rules,if these bio-toxins and hazardous medical waste flows into the rivers or water sources, they will contaminate water. Besides, those who segregate the medical wastes from the landfill also would endanger their lives by coming into contact with germs/poisonous bio-organism.

 

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