Friday, March 1, 2024
 - 
Afrikaans
 - 
af
Albanian
 - 
sq
Amharic
 - 
am
Arabic
 - 
ar
Armenian
 - 
hy
Azerbaijani
 - 
az
Basque
 - 
eu
Belarusian
 - 
be
Bengali
 - 
bn
Bosnian
 - 
bs
Bulgarian
 - 
bg
Catalan
 - 
ca
Cebuano
 - 
ceb
Chichewa
 - 
ny
Chinese (Simplified)
 - 
zh-CN
Chinese (Traditional)
 - 
zh-TW
Corsican
 - 
co
Croatian
 - 
hr
Czech
 - 
cs
Danish
 - 
da
Dutch
 - 
nl
English
 - 
en
Esperanto
 - 
eo
Estonian
 - 
et
Filipino
 - 
tl
Finnish
 - 
fi
French
 - 
fr
Frisian
 - 
fy
Galician
 - 
gl
Georgian
 - 
ka
German
 - 
de
Greek
 - 
el
Gujarati
 - 
gu
Haitian Creole
 - 
ht
Hausa
 - 
ha
Hawaiian
 - 
haw
Hebrew
 - 
iw
Hindi
 - 
hi
Hmong
 - 
hmn
Hungarian
 - 
hu
Icelandic
 - 
is
Igbo
 - 
ig
Indonesian
 - 
id
Irish
 - 
ga
Italian
 - 
it
Japanese
 - 
ja
Javanese
 - 
jw
Kannada
 - 
kn
Kazakh
 - 
kk
Khmer
 - 
km
Korean
 - 
ko
Kurdish (Kurmanji)
 - 
ku
Kyrgyz
 - 
ky
Lao
 - 
lo
Latin
 - 
la
Latvian
 - 
lv
Lithuanian
 - 
lt
Luxembourgish
 - 
lb
Macedonian
 - 
mk
Malagasy
 - 
mg
Malay
 - 
ms
Malayalam
 - 
ml
Maltese
 - 
mt
Maori
 - 
mi
Marathi
 - 
mr
Mongolian
 - 
mn
Myanmar (Burmese)
 - 
my
Nepali
 - 
ne
Norwegian
 - 
no
Pashto
 - 
ps
Persian
 - 
fa
Polish
 - 
pl
Portuguese
 - 
pt
Punjabi
 - 
pa
Romanian
 - 
ro
Russian
 - 
ru
Samoan
 - 
sm
Scots Gaelic
 - 
gd
Serbian
 - 
sr
Sesotho
 - 
st
Shona
 - 
sn
Sindhi
 - 
sd
Sinhala
 - 
si
Slovak
 - 
sk
Slovenian
 - 
sl
Somali
 - 
so
Spanish
 - 
es
Sundanese
 - 
su
Swahili
 - 
sw
Swedish
 - 
sv
Tajik
 - 
tg
Tamil
 - 
ta
Telugu
 - 
te
Thai
 - 
th
Turkish
 - 
tr
Ukrainian
 - 
uk
Urdu
 - 
ur
Uzbek
 - 
uz
Vietnamese
 - 
vi
Welsh
 - 
cy
Xhosa
 - 
xh
Yiddish
 - 
yi
Yoruba
 - 
yo
Zulu
 - 
zu
Subscriber Login

Faster, stronger, better The laundry cycle is speeding up

by Clean India Journal - Editor
0 comment

The post-pandemic boom in retail, commercial and industrial laundries is visible for all to see. How have the needs of the sunshine sector fuelled the growth of equipment suppliers? Mrigank Warrier, Associate Editor, Clean India Journal spoke to exhibitors of the Laundrex India Expo to find out.

All-in-one

Many exhibitors had diversified their product offerings to include everything a launderer might need. For example, Sahyogg had set up a 200 sq ft space to resemble a laundromat, stocked with all the basic equipment required, which included 10 kg machines for regular clothes and 15 kg machines for blankets, quilts and curtains. These machines offer automatic dosing to optimise detergent usage and a unique reverse drying technology that ensures garments emerge almost wrinkle-free, thus reducing operational costs.

Beyond equipment

Sahyogg also assists entrepreneurs in establishing their laundry franchises, by providing comprehensive support for everything from onboarding franchisees and managing operations to software and marketing. “Within a year, we have established seven master franchises and 51 franchisees across India”, said Aman Sawaran, Co-Founder & CEO, Sahyogg.

Less is more

Speaking at the K&B Associates stall, Tim Bacon, Director – Middle-East, Africa and India, Alliance Laundry Systems explained that since tumble dryers consume the maximum amount of energy, power consumption can be reduced by increasing the amount of spin in the washer-extractor. “Higher the spin, less is the water left. This needs a rugged machine which can withstand a force up to 450 G…which we have introduced”.

Better design is complemented by innovative additions. B Krishnamoorthy, Business Head – Commercial Appliances, IFB Industries showcased the XOrbs technology which uses thousands of tiny pellets to reduce water consumption by up to 70%, offers energy savings of up to 50%, and reduces detergent usage.

Design and innovation are backed by a third pillar – smart systems. Orgaearth’s machines have intelligent weighing systems that adjust resource usage according to the weight of the linen that needs to be washed. Ayush Khanijo, Director, Orgaearth Laundry Solutions added: “Our machines come with built-in heating elements, consuming less electricity per hour compared to traditional machines.”

Wet cleaning

There has been a shift towards wet cleaning, due to its environmental benefits. Efforts are being made by machine and chemical manufacturers to ensure that a significant portion of dry cleaning can be replaced by wet cleaning solutions.

Made in India

This edition of the Expo saw indigenous manufacturers of laundry equipment make a mark. There was an Indian alternative for every conceivable fixture in the laundry business.

Prachirith, for example, showcased its decades-long legacy of making in India, with every part – other than the V belt and shock absorber – being manufactured in India. “Buying from an Indian manufacturer guarantees timely delivery and better after-sales service. We are 8-10% more affordable, and export our products to clients as far away as Thailand and Canada”, revealed Hemal Srivastava, Sales Head, Prachitirth.

Only the drain valve needs to be imported, stressed Nelachal Mahapatro, MD of LDF Machinery Pvt Ltd, which manufactures 15-120 kg washer extractors, tumble dryers, steam presses, stain removing machines, calendering machines and trolleys. “Earlier, there wasn’t much focus on finishing machines. Now, flat work ironers are much in demand”.

Client demand  

The fastest growing segments in the laundry industry are laundromats, healthcare, hospitality and pharma.

According to Bacon, there has been exponential growth in the laundromat segment, with the number of laundromats almost doubling every year. This boom isn’t restricted to metro centres, with enquiries coming in even from rural areas, Odisha and the North Eastern states.

The healthcare and hospitality segment have also turned to more professional linen care services. “Medium sized hospitals used to give their linen to unorganised players; in the past few years, they have gone in for on-premises laundries”, shared Srivastava.

“We expect a lot of growth in the commercial segment. The educational sector has grown a lot. Earlier, institutes would purchase equipment themselves; now, there is an equal division between end-user purchases and laundry contractor purchases”, said Mahapatro.

Niche segments

Manufacturers of premium textiles and branded garments need to test their products in washing and drying equipment in textile labs. “These labs constitute a big chunk of our business”, said Harish Tiwari, Senior Manager – Laundry Business, Wang Hospitality Equipment. “On-board laundries on merchant ships, navy ships and cruise ships are another client segment that not many know about”.

The HoReCa segment is also becoming a major player for the laundry business. Equipment suppliers are themselves being asked to set up a laundry on the premises of a client, and process linen on a per kg basis. The large tents put up by caterers are another small but significant part of what this sector needs laundered.

The last word goes to one who explored each stall. Gerard Mascarenhas, Proprietor, Hill Road Cleaners, Mumbai said: “The Laundrex India Expo was the most extensive in terms of the variety of equipment and services on offer. Thanks to this, I was able to finalise on software for my business and have zeroed in on equipment I plan to purchase in the future.”

You may also like

Leave a Comment

Clean India Journal, which began its journey in 2005 with the sole vision of being the prime facilitator in creating a clean India, today reaches out to a vast cross-section of readers across borders.

Top Stories

Newsletter Subscribe

Subscribe my Newsletter for new blog posts, tips & new photos. Let's stay updated!

Copyright © 2023 Clean India Journal All rights reserved.

Are you sure want to unlock this post?
Unlock left : 0
Are you sure want to cancel subscription?

Subscribe For Download Our Media Kit

Get notified about new articles